Request for Indicators: Annual Competitiveness Report, Benchmarking Ireland’s Performance 2010

The National Competitiveness Council reports on key competitiveness issues facing the Irish economy together with recommendations on policy actions required to enhance Ireland’s competitive position.

One of the NCC’s annual publications is Benchmarking Ireland’s Performance. In 2009, this analysis of Ireland’s competitiveness performance used approximately 140 indicators to see how Ireland compares internationally on, for instance, living standards, export performance, prices and costs, productivity, innovation and infrastructure. Now, in preparation for the 2010 report, the NCC would welcome suggestions for additional/alternative internationally comparable indicators that could further our understanding of Ireland’s relative competitiveness.

If you are aware of such indicators and would like to suggest them for inclusion, please email ncc@forfas.ie .

Previously used indicators can be seen in the Annual Competitiveness Report 2009, Volume One: Benchmarking Ireland’s Performance.

7 thoughts on “Request for Indicators: Annual Competitiveness Report, Benchmarking Ireland’s Performance 2010”

  1. Might I suggest:

    * Cost of living – this is fundamental to being able to attract the best foreign talent to a business, in addition to directly impacting the wages that people are paying. To incorporate this, I’d recommend you capture some notion of the money spent on groceries, and the cost of eating out, since you’re already capturing the other costs such as housing costs / utilities / daycare elsewhere in the report.
    * Preschool investments for 0-3 year olds – since that is the formative age for developing traits such as confidence, perseverance, a love of learning etc.
    * Number of high skilled workers who migrated to Ireland
    * speed of changing skill set within company – ability of companies to change the composition of their workforce in response to changing business opportunities/climates/threats. (& time to get rid of workers who can’t do their job?)
    * Number of workers refusing through industrial action to change their work conditions / placement / hours.
    * Is there a way to capture the ecommerce market – the number of potential customers who speak the same language and where the postage to those customers is not prohibitive.
    * Percentage of population in negative equity or close to zero equity (and therefore unable to move to take advantage of greater employment opportunities)
    * Number of workers who have 2+ jobs / who work for minimum wage – indicating a lower quality of life, in the same way that life expectancy/environmental factors indicate a lower quality of life.

  2. Number of suicides
    Number of suicide/murders
    Cost of heroin in a street baggy
    Number of thefts from cars at traffic lights
    Number of kidnaps for amounts under 20,000 euro

  3. To add to David in Dublin’s “* Cost of living – this is fundamental to being able to attract the best foreign talent to a business, in addition to directly impacting the wages that people are paying. To incorporate this, I’d recommend you capture some notion of the money spent on groceries, and the cost of eating out, since you’re already capturing the other costs such as housing costs / utilities / daycare elsewhere in the report.”

    Can we have these broken down by mortgage/rental/no housing cost and car/public transport/no transport cost? Probably want it by management tier also?

    We have to become attractive for other companies to locate here. One of the metrics they will be interested in is how expensive it is to place staff here for start-up, and also what they can expect to pay staff to retain them.

    Giving a menu of costs will help with setting packages. It will also show us where we need further improvement to be internationally competitive.

  4. @yoganmahew – you make the reasonable assumption that the ACR is used to find issues which require policy interventions. However, the ACR has also been used to market Ireland. The two are diametrically opposed as in the latter you would want to hide all indicators that make Ireland look bad, while for the former the only useful indicators are those that identify problem areas.

    It is very easy to come up with a bewildering array of indicators, but what are the important ones?

    The NCC might want to re-read an (unpublished) report they commissioned in 2002, which reviewed their approach/indicators.

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