Irish Economic Association Annual Conference Programme

This year’s IEA will take place on May 8th and 9th in the CastleTroy Park Hotel, Limerick. The ESR Lecture will be given by Prof. Rachel Griffith, while Prof. Jordi Gali will give the Edgeworth Lecture. The conference is full of strong papers from a diverse set of scholars.

The full programme is here.

Registration for the conference is through the exordo site. Early registration costs 95 euros and includes dinner on the 8th. There is a much lower price for student delegates at 25 euros.

Bookings for accommodation should be made directly through the CastleTroy Park Hotel, quoting “IEA2014” for a discounted room price.

I’m looking forward to seeing you there in a few weeks.

Comments

comments

Author: Stephen Kinsella

Senior Lecturer in Economics at the University of Limerick.

6 thoughts on “Irish Economic Association Annual Conference Programme”

  1. Useful. Just two that caught my eye ….[will papers be available online?]

    Blowing the bubble: The global funding of the Irish credit boom

    Mary Everett (Central Bank of Ireland/TCD)

    Abstract
    European global banks played a significant role in the international transmission of liquidity across countries during the period prior to the global financial crisis. This paper examines how European global banks channelled… [ view full abstract ]

    European global banks played a significant role in the international transmission of liquidity across countries during the period prior to the global financial crisis. This paper examines how European global banks channelled finance, raised in US wholesale funding markets, via cross-border banking flows to Irish retail banks during the first decade of the euro. The results confirm that global factors, namely the US leverage of European global banks and global risk,were influential in driving cross-border banking inflows to Ireland. Furthermore, empirical support is found for these global factors, exogenous to the Irish economy, in determining changes in domestic private non-financial sector credit during the Irish credit boom. These results shed new light on the factors determining the international leverage of Irish retail banks and changes in domestic credit during the credit boom.
    …………………………………

    The role of public policy in supporting Innovative Human Capital as a driver of firm level innovation

    Helena Lenihan (University of Limerick)

    Abstract
    Innovation is a well-recognised determinant of growth in firms, regions and in the economy as a whole, although explaining why (and how) firms innovate remains a challenge for academics and practitioners alike (Montalvo,… [ view full abstract ]

    Innovation is a well-recognised determinant of growth in firms, regions and in the economy as a whole, although explaining why (and how) firms innovate remains a challenge for academics and practitioners alike (Montalvo, 2006).

    The knowledge-based theory of the firm emphasises the central role of the individual as the source and creator of knowledge (Grant, 1996). Individuals are also the main actors in innovation (OECD, 2011). Human capital is the aggregation of knowledge and skills (Al-Laham et al., 2011). It promotes growth and development through increased productivity of labour and capital (Mathur, 1999) and is the ‘cement’ that holds “knowledge and innovation systems together” (Soete, 2007, p. 279).

  2. “European global banks played a significant role in the international transmission of liquidity across countries during the period prior to the global financial crisis. This paper examines how European global banks channelled finance, raised in US wholesale funding markets, via cross-border banking flows to Irish retail banks during the first decade of the euro. ”

    Is this not how the system works?

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2bd925be-0bdb-11e3-8840-00144feabdc0.html

    “The truth is more banal: the real cause of the expansion that precedes the typical financial crisis is usually a flood of cheap (or relatively cheap) credit, often from abroad.

    Phase Two of a financial crisis is the downfall itself. It is the moment when everyone realises the emperor is naked; to put it another way, the tide of easy money recedes for some reason, and suddenly the current account deficits, the poverty of investment returns and the fragility of indebted corporations and the banks that lent to them are exposed to view.

    Phase Three is when ministers and central bank governors survey the wreckage of a once-vibrant economy and try to work out how to rebuild it.
    It is traditional for those governments that survive, and for the ones replacing those that do not, to announce several false dawns and to see “green shoots” that turn out to be illusory. “

  3. @ seafóid

    This is how it works!

    http://www.rte.ie/blogs/business/2014/04/07/cold-comfort-iceland-after-the-crash/

    The Prime Time programme, despite the feeble initial attempts by some journalists to quote the Icelandic PM to the effect that Ireland should have followed the Icelandic example, seems certain IMHO to finally create a widespread feeling; “there but for the grace of God etc.”. People are attached to their money, wish to be free to dispose of it and do not wish to see it turned into confetti money overnight on the basis of so-called “expert” advice.

  4. @Brian Woods Snr.

    #17 Black-Scholes Equation has caused enormous damage to the human race; it could more realistically be expressed as:

    #17 = odious profit from mugs

    Minor point:

    They forgot #0 0 = 0 [shukran to the Arabs]

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