DEW Conference – November 2nd

The third in the series of Dublin Economics Workshop meetings on the Irish economy will take place on November 2nd at the Radission SAS Hotel, Golden Lane, Dublin 2.   The programme details are as follows:
1300 Registration
Session 1
Chair and Discussant – John Fitzgerald (ESRI)
1330-1415 David Blanchflower (Dartmouth) – What Should Be Done About Rising Unemployment?
1415-1445 Colm Harmon (UCD) – Education and Innovation Strategies
1445-1515 Discussion and Q&A
1515-1530 Coffee Break
Session 2
Chair and Discussant – Colm McCarthy (UCD)
1530-1600 John McHale (NUIG) – The Other Crisis:  Whither Irish Pensions?
1600-1630 Philip Lane (TCD) – Fiscal Policy and Macroeconomic Adjustment in Ireland
1630-1700 DIscussion and Q&A
Please RSVP to emma.barron@ucd.ie (many thanks to those who have already done so!).  We are looking forward to a full house and a lively meeting.

4 thoughts on “DEW Conference – November 2nd”

  1. From listening to various experts in recent weeks/months it does appear the volatility in price per kwh of electricity is something we will have to face up to. From a point of view of companies based in Ireland which depend on power as a significant input of their production, be it the knowledge economy or otherwise.

    An interesting table here from the DOE in the US, with real and nominal rates per kwh since 1960.

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/txt/ptb0810.html

    Everything I have heard in recent times though, points to a rapid increase in the price over the next 10, 20+ years.

  2. Sometimes, a image or a video can set the right note to think about a future.

    It is really fun to look at some of the Rocky Mountain Institute videos of ecologically friendly designs. I noticed in a video about a school, the kids in the schools were really getting into the concepts used in the building, and how it worked etc.

    http://bet.rmi.org/video/case-study-videos.html

    We in Ireland will hardly have the budgets anymore for really energy efficient schools, they may cost more initially. But can we afford to ignore these features completely? Maybe the best way to approach it, is to adopt some clever kinds of phasing plans, so that more intelligent plant and equipment etc, can be installed later on if needs be, to reduce energy dependency of public buildings.

    One comment made in the video was – the taxpayers love us, because we haven’t wasted their money.

  3. @Chris Horn

    Hi Chris – will post slides asap – can email them to you directly (mail me at colm.harmon@ucd.ie) – I will write up as a note as Philip just posted but that will take a few days

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