8 thoughts on “Chief Economist, Department of Finance”

  1. @ DO’D: Its p*ssing rain. Had to come indoors. So I thought I might share a few thoughts with you.

    Marxist? Paul Sweezy comes to mind. And how about Milton F? He proposed, sincerely, a Negative Income Tax to ensure low-income (or nil income) folk had a minimal disposable income. Else if you pursued the Neo-liberal ‘austerity’ route you would have lots of under-consuming consumers. Not a good career move for a monopoly-capitalist economy going forward, as they say – (to use that dreadfully hackneyed phrase).

    One real, intractable predicament with all political economy ideologies is that they are ‘one-way’ streets. And work swingingly as long as these uni-directional policies are supported by continuously expanding economic activity. But when the stagnation downturns set in ….!!!

    I do not believe we need a Chief Economist. Just some folk who are capable of getting off their arses, spend a goodly amount of time ‘walking around’ outside and get a first-hand knowledge of what our economic problems are, and make plausible proposals based on the resources available to put those proposals into effect. Too much to ask?

  2. “.. some folk who are capable of getting off their arses, spend a goodly amount of time ‘walking around’ outside and get a first-hand knowledge of what our economic problems are, and make plausible proposals based on the resources available to put those proposals into effect. Too much to ask?

    Certainly not too much to ask. Of course, there are no solid marxist economists in Irish economics departments (wonder why?) – so we do need to look yonder.

  3. @ DO’D: “… there are no solid marxist economists in Irish economics departments (wonder why?)”

    They are about. Mercille is one – though he’s not an econ – as far as I know. He’s in Geography. Its hard to judge the post-grad stuff, but with undergrads you have to stick with the programme menu, given the frantic pace of tuition and examination schedules. Little time to be ‘educated’. That’s a real luxury. Have to do it in your spare time. If you have any!

    Anyhow, as I opined – all ideologies are sort of one-way streets – no reverse policies when conditions change. So, it would be sort of like an American Football team. You have offensive crews, defensive crews, field-goal kicking crews, etc. Like to be the coach then?

    I’d apply for the job, ‘cept I’m far too well qualified! And I would not even need the salary! And being in the proximity of politicians makes me feel like I’m sailing across the George’s Channel in a Force 10, SW storm! Very unpleasant! 😎

    Sun is out. Back to the garden time!

  4. … not so much ‘ideology’ as a superior pragmatic ‘methodology’ – the ol dialectic and all dat. Methinks such an economist might have something to say on the ‘HOW?’ of fiscal adjustment as distinct from the abstract one liner suggestions of the neo-classicals.

  5. @ DO’D: Thanks. Yes, the HOW. Karl Popper (the Open Society and Its Enemies) continually posed that, somewhat inconvenient, question. No easy answers.

  6. The add for the job as mentioned above contains this line “This will involve working closely with Government and other key stakeholders” which on the face of it looks fine, but my question is who are “the other key stakeholders”

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