Irish Quantitative History Workshop 2013

The annual Irish Quantitative History group meeting will take place in TCD, in the IIIS seminar room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, on Friday 25th January 2013, 2pm-6 pm.

  • Peter Solar (Free University Brussels), ‘Market Integration between Ireland and Britain: Timing, Causes and Consequences’

  • Frank Barry (Trinity College Dublin), ‘A Firm-Level Database on Manufacturing Industry in Protectionist-Era Ireland’

  • Richard McMahon (University of Edinburgh), ‘Homicide and Irish migration in late nineteenth-century San Francisco’

  • Aidan Kane (NUI Galway), ‘Exploring 17th century credit networks in the Irish Staple database’

  • Charles Read (University of Cambridge), ‘The Repeal Year: A Quantitative Reassessment’

  • As numbers are limited, please email iqhistory@gmail.com if you intend to go along, and/or if you wish to be added to the IQH group mailing list. The workshop page (hosted by the Centre for Economic History at QUB) is here. The convenor of IQH is Eoin McLaughlin (University of Edinburgh).

    New issue of Administration

    A new issue of the journal Administration is now available. Full details here. Some of the articles are available to non-subscribers:

    New issue/re-launch of journal Administration available

    A new issue of the journal Administration is out today.

    To mark the journal’s ‘re-launch’, this issue is available in full for free online here.

    As many readers will know, Administration is published by the Institute of Public Administration, and has been a key locus for research-led debate on economic development, and of course on wider developments in the public sector and society, since 1953.

    The current issue includes prefatory articles from the incoming editor Muiris MacCarthaigh, who `sets out his stall’, and from Tony McNamara, who has edited Administration since 1989. These will be of interest no doubt to a wide readership and to various contributor bases, (e.g., from academic, practitioner and civil society perspectives).

    As the contents indicate, the focus of this issue is on public sector reform, with an opening piece by Brendan Howlin TD, Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform. I guess that Ministers historically have been uneven in how or whether they contribute to debate at this level; perhaps this is a good cue to them, and to politicians more generally, to get their quills out.

    Contents
    Notes from the Editors:

    • “Renewing public administration research and practice” by Muiris MacCarthaigh
    • “A final word” by Tony McNamara

    Articles:


    • “Reform of the public service” by Brendan Howlin, TD
    • “Progress and pitfalls in public service reform and performance management in Ireland” by Mary Lee Rhodes & Richard Boyle
    • “Regulating everything: From mega- to meta-regulation” by Colin Scott
    • “Trust and public administration” by Geert Bouckaert
    • “The reform of public administration in Northern Ireland: a squandered opportunity?” by Colin Knox

    Reviews:

    • Third report of the Organisational Review Programme
    • The challenge of change: Putting patients before providers

    www.ipa.ie/administration

    Data journalism handbook

    Via the excellent Flowing data, an interesting free guidebook: the Data Journalism Handbook.

    Worth a look, including for the link to a rather good interactive data visualisation from the New York Times of 2009 “The Jobless Rate for People Like You“.

    Research Prioritisation Report

    According to an Irish Times story by Dick Ahlstrom and Fiona Reddan the government has approved the report of the Research Prioritisation Steering Group in identifying 14 priority areas for state-funded research. The report itself is here.

    One might hope (though probably in vain) that this would prompt some wider debate. For example, might at least some policy makers be even slightly concerned to question:


    • the merits or otherwise of an increasingly centralised model of state planning for innovation,
    • the continued privileging of scientific and technological knowledge which current policy advances,
    • the extent to which the relentless shift towards commercialisable state-funded research is in conflict with a core original rationale for this policy: namely the provision of public goods—those which are by definition not commercialisable (current policy can look a lot like socialising the costs, while privatising the benefits), and:
    • the further opportunities for rent-seeking, by both industry and academics, this sort of exercise creates and embeds, and relatedly, the high political value thereby assigned to demonstrating (by innovators, no less!) compliance with hierarchy, obedience to instructions and the uncritical acceptance of a consensus policy, aka ‘groupthink’?