Cass Sunstein – New Directions in Behaviourally Informed Policy

The video of Professor Cass Sunstein’s recent talk “New Directions in Behaviourally Informed Policy” at UCD is available, along with links to papers and other reading, at this link. The event was hosted jointly by the UCD College of Social Science and UCD Geary Institute for Public Policy in conjunction with the Irish Behavioural Science and Policy Network. The talk is followed by a very wide-ranging Q+A and also includes a number of observations about this area of policy in Ireland.

Economic and Social Review – Spring 2017

The new edition of the ESR is online now with the following papers:

The changing nature of Irish wage inequality from boom to bust by Niamh Holton and Donal O’Neill

Understanding Irish labour force participation by Stephen Byrne and Martin O’Brien

Addressing market segmentation and incentives for risk selection: How well does risk equalisation in the Irish private health insurance market work? by Conor Keegan, Conor Teljeur, Brian Turner and Steve Thomas

Are perceptions of greatness accurate? A statistical analysis of Brian O’Driscoll’s contribution to the Irish rugby team by Peter D. Lunn and David Duffy

Gambling

A colleague has pointed out this Economist piece on gambling to me. Check out the figures on average annual gambling losses per resident adult, and where Ireland comes in the list: am I the only one who thinks these numbers are enormous? Or that we should perhaps be worried about them — especially the very large online component?

(This also gives me an excuse to complain about the FAI’s League of Ireland streaming deal with an online gambling company.)

Does trade policy only have a small impact on trade flows? Interwar evidence

I have been working for a number of years on interwar trade policy, trying to see if using more fine-grained data will alter the consensus view that 1930s protectionism didn’t matter much for trade flows, in the context of everything else that was going on at the time. It is time-consuming work, but we are beginning to produce some results now, the first of which are previewed here. And I suppose that one upside of the time it has taken us to put the dataset together is that, in the meantime, Brexit intervened, which will hopefully increase interest in quantitative studies of trade policy!